Categories
HEALTH HWH COMMENTARY

VIRUSES ARE TERRORISTS

Yes that’s right, they murder people and all other animals and life forms.

They’re smart – smarter than we are.

So it takes a lot of smart people to combat those terrorist viruses.

Viruses don’t eat, so they can’t grow, they can only multiply, but they can’t multiply themselves. They need a cell they can trick into letting them in, and from there the cell multiplies the virus for them.

Protein receptors are what the viruses use to trick our cells into letting them in.

Yes, they’re terrorists. They strike at will any target that can make them multiply and thrive.

They mow you down when you least expect it, because you can’t see them coming or feel them attack.

Ever meet a virus that didn’t want to kill you? Or at the minimum make your life a living hell? Well, researchers claim that many viruses are helpful, not harmful, so I’m not disputing that here. I’m talking about the viruses that make a body sick.

Are you immune? I hope so, but few actually are immune to the invisible attack that no one feels until it’s too late and then what you feel is the virus overtaking your systems making you sick and sicker.

So, the real kicker is that our own bodies are tricked into letting them in through our protein receptors that match up with theirs.

  • That might be something to study – how our cells can learn to differentiate a harmless/beneficial virus from a harmful virus – and then find a way to keep our cells from letting harmful viruses into our bodies.
  • Of course, that may be as difficult as determining who is a human terrorist and who is not, and then finding ways to make the human terrorists not want to terrorize.
  • Or, find a way for good viruses to attack harmful viruses.
  • Or, mobilize/activate beneficial bacteria to attack harmful viruses without harming the occupied organism.

Viruses thrive inside the organism like parasites, or on the organism like barnacles.

Viruses don’t have cells, so they need to occupy a host cell to replicate themselves, using our cells to do it.

Once one cell lets them in, all the cells do.

Close the door.

Get to the source of the occupier, not the occupied, that’s the key.

Any culture that refuses to participate in the annihilation of the viruses by providing breeding grounds for the viruses to flourish, needs to be held accountable and made to stop harboring enemy viruses.

Unless they do, the terrorists will continue to have their way with the world – wiping out all who exists. Just for the pleasure of it. Killer viruses enjoy the havoc they wreak. You can’t retaliate because you can’t see them. Twinkle twinkle little star. Happy sweet dreams.

Remember me from long ago? Well I’ve changed, mutated into a new better equipped fighting force against the invisible. Can you see me, they laugh through their ugly guts? Do they have guts?

Your cells are occupied by them. Manufacturing them, then they spread to other cells. Front door, back door, cut them off. Make them die where they stand. Don’t just knock them out to remain dormant till another army comes in to reactivate them.

There’s a virus war going on. Good virus vs bad virus.

That’s where you hit them – smack dab in their center of their occupier guts.

Are you listening or reading, hoping for a cure? Oh, you thought I meant the human it enters?

You cure the virus to render it ineffective in it’s quest to destroy.

There will be many more armies to come. Better soldiers than the ones before – obliterating senselessly frantically, chaotically – hoping to be stopped because as the world knows they can’t stop themselves.

They’re on a killing spree.

They don’t contain in their DNA/RNA the required properties to self-regulate their destructive urges, as beneficial viruses do.

As I said long ago, it is what we can’t see that will destroy us, because of our habits – primarily our eating habits.

Viruses thrive in the areas in which we show weakness and recklessness.

You can eat a virus contained in what was once living.

Are viruses animals? Do they have nervous systems that we don’t accept as real, because they don’t mimic ours? Or because we need a microscope to see them?

Too small to matter to us, we thought? Insignificant we thought? Till one day we wake up to the reality that it was that smallest, out of view, minority that grew to a majority and wiped us all out?

Viruses are old. You think they’re young because they mutate, when in fact they carry the old baggage with them.

It’s like people breeding. They carry with them the past of the mother and the father and everyone before them since the beginning of existence.

Yes, they’re new now, but they carry old recessive baggage with them – so the old is what you attack in the virus, using old methods – not new – since new treatments were based on the new part of the mutation.

The old is the weakest part of a virus. Attack the weakest, old, part and the new will die, because it hasn’t yet learned to survive – only to flourish in a chaotic rush. And the old part, being so weak, and dependent on the new part, forgot how to flourish.

AN ANALOGY:

June 2019 I was hospitalized with Sepsis from unknown organisms. The doctors tried numerous antibiotics to keep my fever from rising again after the administration of fever-reducing medication.

Finally, I related a story about having something similar in 1970 while I was in nursing school, hospitalized with high fever – only at night. For three weeks, while hospitalized, the doctors encountered the same problem. They couldn’t find a drug that would keep the fever from re-rising. Eventually, they found one that worked.

One of the doctors treating me in June 2019 asked what the name of it was. I couldn’t remember, except that it started with “E”.

When my fever finally stayed down and I had to wait 24 hours in hospital for it to stay down, I got out of bed and looked at the tiny bag attached to the I.V. pole. It read Erythromycin. That was it. Eureka. I remembered then, the name. It was the same drug given to me in 1970.

I was diagnosed with infectious mononucleosis with secondary inflammation of liver and spleen which were confirmed by lab tests. Whatever else I had remained a mystery.

Mononucleosis is a viral infection, yet Erythromycin is an antibacterial agent. I was checked for various blood cancers, since I trained in a cancer hospital – and many medical professionals at the time were beginning to consider cancer a virus. Plus my lymphocyte count was 85 %. However, there wasn’t a significant rise in my white count.

What I aim to communicate here is to think outside the box. What you think isn’t possible, might be, so explore using your imagination and your gut, in addition to the science to guide you.

Two plus two doesn’t always equal four.





By Sharon Lee Davies-Tight

Paid for by The Animal-Free Chef, AFC GLOBAL and/or Word Warrior GLOBAL. Till now and forever © Sharon Lee Davies-Tight. Share freely with proper credit. "Change the world by changing yourself. You're in the future already. Now what? You determine your outcome."